Speaker for the Dead

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I'm a PhD candidate. In general, my interests span across archaeology and physical anthropology
This blog has anthropology related posts with some added quirkiness reflecting my personality.
If you have an anthro blog and want me to follow you back, just message me!
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thedivinesociety:

"There are as many atoms in a single molecule of your DNA as there are stars in a typical galaxy. The same is true for dogs, bears and every living thing. We are, each of us, a little universe.
— Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey; Episode 2

thedivinesociety:

"There are as many atoms in a single molecule of your DNA as there are stars in a typical galaxy. The same is true for dogs, bears and every living thing. We are, each of us, a little universe.
— Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey; Episode 2

(Source: thedivinesociety)

museumsandthings:

Museums on Instagram: A List

(a blog post by Russell Dornan)

Click through and read to find a selection of some of the best (and less obvious) museum Instagram accounts. Get following for fantastic objects and brilliant behind the scenes views.

(via jangojips)

zune-politikon:

Check it ooooout. Laser cleaning the Caryatids. If this isn’t the sickest shit you’ve ever seen, then I don’t wanna know you.

(via suzythered)

Ancient DNA could unlock South Florida secret

archaeologicalnews:

About 14,000 years ago, modern humans roamed to South Florida and lived side by side with mammoths, mastodons and saber-tooth tigers.

That, at least, is what Florida Atlantic University scientists hope to prove by analyzing ancient DNA found at an archaeological dig in Vero Beach.

If they can confirm the age of some very brittle bones, it will fill a major gap in human history, said Greg O’Corry-Crowe, an FAU associate research professor. “It would imply that humans were on this continent much longer than originally thought,” he said.

Officially called the Old Vero Man site, the dig is considered one of the most important archaeological finds in North America. Read more.

ancientpeoples:

Rishi coffin of Puhorsenbu
c.1580-1479 BC
17th-18th Dynasty, Late Second Intermediate Period/Early New Kingdom
The Arabic word “rishi,” meaning feathered, is used to describe a group of coffins made in the Theban area during Dynasty 17 and early Dynasty 18. This coffin is a particularly fine example of the type. Special care has been taken with the modelling of the face. The feather pattern has become an abstract design, as has the broad collar, whose strands of beads echo the contour of the vulture pendant making the bird’s wings appear to extend up the mummy’s shoulders. 
(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Rishi coffin of Puhorsenbu

c.1580-1479 BC

17th-18th Dynasty, Late Second Intermediate Period/Early New Kingdom

The Arabic word “rishi,” meaning feathered, is used to describe a group of coffins made in the Theban area during Dynasty 17 and early Dynasty 18. This coffin is a particularly fine example of the type. Special care has been taken with the modelling of the face. The feather pattern has become an abstract design, as has the broad collar, whose strands of beads echo the contour of the vulture pendant making the bird’s wings appear to extend up the mummy’s shoulders. 

(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

(via ryanbroadley)

Amphipolis: There might be a fourth chamber in the Tomb

archaeologicalnews:

image

A high-ranking Ministry of Culture official told Greek news sources that the archaeologists who are currently clearing out the dirt from the third chamber in the Amphipolis tomb believe that a fourth chamber may exist.

Meanwhile, the head of the excavation Katerina Peristeri told journalists that based on the findings so far, she believes the enigmatic tomb definitely dates back to the last quarter of the 4th century B.C. Mrs. Peristeri complained about colleagues who appear in the media claiming that the tomb may have been constructed in the Roman era.

“The tomb is Macedonian. We have all the proof for that.” said Mrs. Peristeri. “It’s futile for some people to say that it is Roman. I feel indignation against some colleagues of mine that speak to the TV channels, just for 5 minutes on prime time TV without knowing anything about the excavation.” (source)

nok-ind:

Africa’s Oldest Known Boat
8000 years ago, in the region now known as Nigeria. ”Africa’s oldest known boat” the Dufuna Canoe was discovered near the region of the River Yobe. The Canoe was discovered by a Fulani herdsman in May 1987, in Dufuna Village while digging a well. The canoe’s “almost black wood”, said to be African mahogany, as “entirely an organic material”. Various Radio-Carbon tests conducted in laboratories of reputable Universities in Europe and America indicate that the Canoe is over 8000 years old, thus making it the oldest in Africa and 3rd oldest in the World. Little is known of the period to which the boat belongs, in archaeological terms it is described as an early phase of the Later Stone Age, which began rather more than 12,000 years ago and ended with the appearance of pottery. 

The lab results redefined the pre-history of African water transport, ranking the Dufuna canoe as the world’s third oldest known dugout. Older than it are the dugouts from Pesse, Netherlands, and Noyen-sur-Seine, France. But evidence of an 8,000-year-old tradition of boat building in Africa throws cold water on the assumption that maritime transport developed much later there in comparison with Europe. Peter Breunig of the University of Frankfurt, Germany, an archaeologist involved in the project, says the canoe’s age “forces a reconsideration of Africa’s role in the history of water transport”. It shows, he adds, “that the cultural history of Africa was not determined by Near Eastern and European influences but took its own, in many cases parallel, course”. Breunig, adding that it even outranks in style European finds of similar age. According to him, “The bow and stern are both carefully worked to points, giving the boat a notably more elegant form”, compared to “the dugout made of conifer wood from Pesse in the Netherlands, whose blunt ends and thick sides seem crude”. To go by its stylistic sophistication, he reasons, “It is highly probable that the Dufuna boat does not represent the beginning of a tradition, but had already undergone a long development, and that the origins of water transport in Africa lie even further back in time.”

Egypt’s oldest known boat is 5000 years old.

P. Breunig, The 8000-year-old dugout canoe from Dufuna (NE Nigeria), G. Pwiti and R. Soper (eds.), Aspects of African Archaeology. Papers from the 10th Congress of the PanAfrican Association for Prehistory and related Studies. University of Zimbabwe Publications (Harare 1996) 461-468.
ISBN: 0908307551

nok-ind:

Africa’s Oldest Known Boat
8000 years ago, in the region now known as Nigeria. ”Africa’s oldest known boat” the Dufuna Canoe was discovered near the region of the River Yobe. The Canoe was discovered by a Fulani herdsman in May 1987, in Dufuna Village while digging a well. The canoe’s “almost black wood”, said to be African mahogany, as “entirely an organic material”. Various Radio-Carbon tests conducted in laboratories of reputable Universities in Europe and America indicate that the Canoe is over 8000 years old, thus making it the oldest in Africa and 3rd oldest in the World. Little is known of the period to which the boat belongs, in archaeological terms it is described as an early phase of the Later Stone Age, which began rather more than 12,000 years ago and ended with the appearance of pottery. 
The lab results redefined the pre-history of African water transport, ranking the Dufuna canoe as the world’s third oldest known dugout. Older than it are the dugouts from Pesse, Netherlands, and Noyen-sur-Seine, France. But evidence of an 8,000-year-old tradition of boat building in Africa throws cold water on the assumption that maritime transport developed much later there in comparison with Europe. Peter Breunig of the University of Frankfurt, Germany, an archaeologist involved in the project, says the canoe’s age “forces a reconsideration of Africa’s role in the history of water transport”. It shows, he adds, “that the cultural history of Africa was not determined by Near Eastern and European influences but took its own, in many cases parallel, course”. Breunig, adding that it even outranks in style European finds of similar age. According to him, “The bow and stern are both carefully worked to points, giving the boat a notably more elegant form”, compared to “the dugout made of conifer wood from Pesse in the Netherlands, whose blunt ends and thick sides seem crude”. To go by its stylistic sophistication, he reasons, “It is highly probable that the Dufuna boat does not represent the beginning of a tradition, but had already undergone a long development, and that the origins of water transport in Africa lie even further back in time.”
Egypt’s oldest known boat is 5000 years old.
P. Breunig, The 8000-year-old dugout canoe from Dufuna (NE Nigeria), G. Pwiti and R. Soper (eds.), Aspects of African Archaeology. Papers from the 10th Congress of the PanAfrican Association for Prehistory and related Studies. University of Zimbabwe Publications (Harare 1996) 461-468.
ISBN: 0908307551

(via anthrocentric)

Walking With Lucy | California Academy of Sciences

Appearing next to a full—scale recreation of the famous “Lucy” skeleton (Australopithecus afarensis) in Tusher African Hall, this computer animation compares the distinctive gaits of a chimpanzee, A. afarensis, and modern human, highlighting the trait of upright walking that the latter two share.

For more information on our Human Odyssey exhibit, visit our website:http://www.calacademy.org/human-odyssey

Tumblr disappoints me sometimes…

I searched “bipedal” to try to find some comparative gifs for my lecture next week…

And instead I found a whole lot of brony porn… 

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