Speaker for the Dead

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I'm a PhD candidate. In general, my interests span across archaeology and physical anthropology
This blog has anthropology related posts with some added quirkiness reflecting my personality.
If you have an anthro blog and want me to follow you back, just message me!
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Book Giveaway

anthrocentric:

Hey guys! Okay, here are the rules:

  • Reblog this to express interest
  • Like to express interest
  • 1 reblog and 1 like per person
  • I would prefer it if you didn’t reblog this onto all your blogs, but I’m honestly not gonna comb through all the urls
  • I will say though, that if my randomizer chooses someone, and their blog was obviously made for these sort of things, I will choose someone else.
  • I will select three people and they can choose one book they want from the list under the cut below
  • I will be adding more books to the list as I decide I don’t need them
  • I will also prefer the winners to be one of my followers, BUT
  • You do not have to follow me to win
  • I will ship internationally.
  • Once the giveaway winners are announced, I will post the rest of the list if any of you guys want to buy the books. 
  • You have until September 20th.

Best!

Read More

theolduvaigorge:

Neanderthal Infant and Adult Infracranial Remains from Marillac (Charente, France)

  • by María Dolores Garralda, Bruno Maureille and Bernard Vandermeersch

"At the site of Marillac, near the Ligonne River in Marillac-le-Franc (Charente, France), a remarkable stratigraphic sequence has yielded a wealth of archaeological information, palaeoenvironmental data, as well as faunal and human remains. Marillac must have been a sinkhole used by Neanderthal groups as a hunting camp during MIS 4 (TL date 57,600 6 4,600BP), where Quina Mousterian lithics and fragmented bones of reindeer predominate. This article describes three infracranial skeleton fragments. Two of them are from adults and consist of the incomplete shafts of a right radius (Marillac 24) and a left fibula (Marillac 26). The third fragment is the diaphysis of the right femur of an immature individual (Marillac 25), the size and shape of which resembles those from Teshik-Tash and could be assigned to a child of a similar age. The three fossils have been compared with the remains of other Neanderthals or anatomically Modern Humans (AMH). Furthermore, the comparison of the infantile femora, Marillac 25 and Teshik-Tash, with the remains of several European children from the early Middle Ages clearly demonstrates the robustness and rounded shape of both Neanderthal diaphyses. Evidence of peri-mortem manipulations have been identified on all three bones, with spiral fractures, percussion pits and, in the case of the radius and femur, unquestionable cutmarks made with flint implements, probably during defleshing. Traces of periostosis appear on the fibula fragment and on the immature femoral diaphysis, although their aetiology remains unknown" (read more/not open access).

(Source: American Journal of Physical Anthropology 155(1):99-113, 2014)   

rhamphotheca:

Jurassic Jaws: How Ancient Crocodyliforms Flourished During the Time of the Dinosaurs

While most modern crocodiles live in and feed on mammals and fish, their ancient relatives were extremely diverse – with some built for running around like dogs on land and others adapting to life in the , imitating the feeding behaviour of today’s .

Research published today [11 Sept.] in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B shows, for the first time, how the jaws of ancient crocodiles evolved to enable these animals to survive in vastly different environments, all whilst living alongside the dinosaurs 235 to .

The study was conducted by Tom Stubbs and Dr Emily Rayfield from the University of Bristol, together with Dr Stephanie Pierce from The Royal Veterinary College and Dr Phil Anderson from Duke University.

Tom Stubbs, who led the research at the University of Bristol, said: “The ancestors of today’s crocodiles have a fascinating history that is relatively unknown compared to their dinosaur counterparts. They were very different creatures to the ones we are familiar with today, much more diverse and, as this research shows, their ability to adapt was quite remarkable.

"Their evolution and anatomical variation during the Mesozoic Era was exceptional. They evolved lifestyles and feeding ecologies unlike anything seen today."…

(read more at: PhysOrg)

(via oosik)

ancientart:

Egyptian relief of mourning men.
This limestone relief dates to ca. 1352-1336 B.C.E., and is from Saqqara, Egypt.

This relief fragment shows two men, on the right, who make the gestures of mourners. The small cuts in the stone surface above and in front of the figures represent the dust that mourning Egyptians poured on their heads as a sign of bereavement. To the left can be seen the traces of a man in official dress who appears to be hurrying from the opened door of the tomb. Unlike many of the objects in this gallery, the scene suggests distress in the presence of death.

Courtesy of & currently located at the Brooklyn Museum, USA, via their online collections: 69.114. +If you’re interested in learning more about mourning in ancient Egypt, check out this post I did a while ago on the matter.

ancientart:

Egyptian relief of mourning men.

This limestone relief dates to ca. 1352-1336 B.C.E., and is from Saqqara, Egypt.

This relief fragment shows two men, on the right, who make the gestures of mourners. The small cuts in the stone surface above and in front of the figures represent the dust that mourning Egyptians poured on their heads as a sign of bereavement. To the left can be seen the traces of a man in official dress who appears to be hurrying from the opened door of the tomb. Unlike many of the objects in this gallery, the scene suggests distress in the presence of death.

Courtesy of & currently located at the Brooklyn Museum, USA, via their online collections69.114. +If you’re interested in learning more about mourning in ancient Egypt, check out this post I did a while ago on the matter.

Violence in the Prehistoric Southwestern United States

gearbooks:

image

https://news.wsu.edu/2014/08/04/wsu-researchers-see-violent-era-in-ancient-southwest/#.U-1uKyDnZjq

When the drought set in with a vengeance at around A.D. 1130, the ancestral Puebloan culture known as the Anasazi began to crumble.   In his classic work, MAN CORN, Christy Turner documented kivas (subterranean ceremonial chambers) filled with nothing but severed heads, or filled with headless bodies, infants shoved into the ventilator shafts to block the air, cannibalism, and other episodes of extreme violence.  The fascinating thing about this new study is not the kinds of violence but the stunning figure that around 90% of the human remains recovered from Mesa Verde, Colorado, (that date to between A.D. 1140-1180) demonstrate trauma to the skull or arms.  The warfare, probably caused by a scramble for food resources, must have been constant and ugly. 

Paddlers support First Nations chiefs’ demand to stop construction on Grace Islet

archaeologicalnews:

image

On August 26, 40 paddlers and a few brave swimmers made their way to Grace Islet in Ganges Harbour, led by a 30 ft cedar dugout canoe from Cowichan Tribes. Holding hands and singing, they came to support demands by chiefs from seven local First Nations to stop construction of a luxury home on this sacred burial ground.

Led by Tseycum Chief Vern Jacks and together with members from the Cowichan, Musqueam and Kwakiutl First Nations, protectors of all ages from Salt Spring Island bore witness to the desecration of the ancient burial cairns, now encased in concrete in complete violation of the site alteration permit issued by the Archaeology Branch. Read more.

This woman terrifies me in general…and the fact she popped up in my Facebook’s “People You May Know” section…with this picture… does NOT help . 

I feel judgment in those eyes…

This woman terrifies me in general…and the fact she popped up in my Facebook’s “People You May Know” section…with this picture… does NOT help .

I feel judgment in those eyes…

fishstickmonkey:

Ballplayer Figure in Costume

Guatemala, Northern Petén region, Maya, 550-850

Sculpture
Ceramic
7 3/4 x 4 1/2 x 3 in. (19.69 x 11.43 x 7.62 cm)
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